Forum Posts

Sumaiya Khatun
Jan 18, 2022
In General Discussions
As new threats arise, it is imperative to keep policies up to date to protect your business. Your employee handbook needs to include a multi-tiered IT employee data security plan made up of policies for which all staff, including executives, management and even the IT department are held accountable. Acceptable Use Policy - Specifically indicate what is permitted versus what is prohibited to protect the corporate systems from unnecessary exposure to employee data risk. Include resources such as internal and external e-mail use, social media, web browsing (including acceptable browsers and websites), computer systems, and downloads (whether from an online source or flash drive). This employee data policy should be acknowledged by every employee with a signature to signify they understand the expectations set forth in the policy. Confidential Data Policy - Identifies examples of employee data data your business considers confidential and how the information should be handled. This information is often the type of files which should be regularly backed up and are the target for many cyber criminal activities. E-mail Policy - E-mail can be a convenient method for conveying information employee data however the written record of communication also is a source of liability should it enter the wrong hands. Having an e-mail policy creates a consistent guidelines for all sent and received e-mails and integrations which may be used to access the company network. BOD/Telecommuting employee data Policy - The Bring Your Own Device (BOD) policy covers mobile devices as well as network access used to connect to company data remotely. While virtualization can be a great idea for employee data many businesses, it is crucial for staff to understand the risks smart phones and unsecured WiFi present. Wireless Network and Guest Access Policy - Any access to the network not made directly by your IT team should follow strict guidelines to control known risks. When guests visit your business, you may want to constrict their access to outbound internet use only for example and add other employee data security measures to anyone accessing the company's network tirelessly. Incident Response Policy - Formalize the process the employee would follow in the case of a cyber-incident. Consider scenarios such as a lost or stolen laptop, a malware attack or the employee falling for a phishing scheme and employee data providing confidential details to an unapproved recipient.
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Sumaiya Khatun

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